Fiona

Climate chaos sucks. Hurricanes are terrible.

David and I have been through several wind events during the last 11 years. We’ve lost our share of field tunnels and cleaned up the wreckage afterwards. With Fiona, our outdoor crops got a wind-whipping, but the field tunnels and greenhouses stood firm. We took the plastic off three of our tunnels, so those tomato and pepper crops are pretty much a write-off. It turns out, though, our farm was not in an area that got hit hard. But we have farm friends who were in areas that got hit hard and that hurts.

We were so impressed with the farm team. They made a list of what needed to be done to prepare for the storm and they did it all. The Market team was also amazing. They had three very busy days last week and when they closed on Friday, David detached the posts of the gazebo, and they just carried the whole thing inside the building! On Sunday they carried it back outside again. We’ve seen too many post-storm mangled gazebos to leave it outside.

Eli installing an endwall on the greenhouse before the storm
Kara taking down the plastic on a field tunnel full of tomatoes before the storm, a heartbreaking job. These crops were trashed.
This broccoli may or may not survive the storm
Be careful what you wish for! We were so dry all summer that we were hoping like crazy for rain. During the days before and after Fiona, we got about 10 cm of rain, which we are grateful for. I’m glad we didn’t get more. Our ponds filled up and the soil is wet. At this point, we are wishing for moderation.
The rain brought good germination of cover crops! Rye and clover.
Rachel and Red Russian kale
This little eft was happy about the rain, showing up right before the storm
On top of her regular work, Eli grew a crop of Delicata squash. What a great side hustle! She got it harvested and in the greenhouse before the storm Photo: Sarah